Marjorie Taylor Greene’s rhetorical genius

I’m amused by the latest overreactive dust-up on the part of ostensibly polite society over Marjorie Taylor Greene’s comments last week about mask mandates, and the analogy she made of them to Nazi Germany, because I had made a related analogy when speaking with my wife about COVID vaccinations several weeks ago.  The main difference being I’m not an elected politician, but whatever, I went there a week before Greene.

I’m not sure what the specific subject was, but we were talking about vaccines and passports and other forms of “vaccine status validation” and she mentioned something along the lines of people being required to carry their vaccine cards at all times, like you would carry your driver’s license or proof of insurance while driving.  “Why don’t they just tattoo our arms,” I remarked cynically.

Jab this

Greene’s analogy about masks is very insightful.  It is rhetorical, a strategy that seems very lost on most of the unironic Woke dopes in today’s social playground.  Masks are non-invasive and they come off as easy as they go on.  The only time, even in the heat of the pandemic, that you really needed to wear them was in public when people were around.  There was never real enforcement and at most you risked a polite request to mask up before entering a store.  Hardly the gestapo.  This is similar to the Jewish star but without the prohibitive tyrannical force of death behind it, but the analogy remains.

I wonder if the next stage or level of this incremental enforcement would be mandated vaccinations.  We aren’t there yet but we have reached a scary level of quasi-mandated vaccinations which have become a socially engineered rite of passage into the normal workings of everyday society.  A fitting analogy for this next step are the invasive and bodily intrusions directed by authorities when cornering us into being vaccinated as contrasted with required tattoos and governmental mandating of its agenda by usurping our physical autonomy.

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